Welcome to the Australian Preppers Forum. The forum runs on a secure platform and is optimised for mobile devices. Register to get involved. Get started with an Introduction here or by letting us know "What Are You Prepping for?"

The Flintlock Pistol.

'Nuff said. Lets talk.
User avatar
Keith
Posts in topic: 7
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:39 pm

The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Keith » Sat Mar 31, 2018 1:45 pm

Many people underestimate the muzzle-loading gun, why I don't know. I suppose it is because they have become used to using modern breech-loading guns & see the flintlock as being too primitive. But these guns served in war, for hunting & for self defence & after 300 years, people are still using them. You may prefer a .357 magnum revolver, or perhaps a 9mm semi-automatic, but have you got one? Can you get one? Are you prepared to jump through the official hoops in order to be able to own & use one?

The antique flintlock pistol, at least in NSW, requires no licence, no permit to purchase & no registration. You do not have to notify the authorities & you do not have to show your pistol to the police during a normal firearms check at your home. What you can't do right now is "use" your antique flintlock pistol, but I find this of little concern knowing that I have it in my possession ready for use should there be a time when there is no law & order in our society.

A smoothbore flintlock pistol can digest buck & ball, just round ball or shot or a combination of shot sizes. Even the inexpensive screw barrels make a good self defence weapon close up. My own flintlock pistol is a .70 caliber with a cannon barrel & a left hand lock. I do not need to fire this pistol to know what it can do, because I have used these guns before when I was licenced for them in the Territory. They are a great back up gun for hunting dangerous game & a pistol like mine can stop several targets in one shot with the right load. If there is never a need to use this tool, then I do at least have an investment for the future that will only gain in value. That is after all why I purchased it :)
Keith.
ImageImage


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Warrigal
Posts in topic: 1
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:06 am

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Warrigal » Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:52 pm

I am curious about flintlocks and have been slowly coming to see their potentials as long term survival kit.

However the idea of buying an antique flintlock piece has never occured to me before.

This is an interesting concept and one which I think does have value for Survivalists given the present status of our laws.



Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
Keith
Posts in topic: 7
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Keith » Sun Jun 02, 2019 3:40 pm

Warrigal wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:52 pm
I am curious about flintlocks and have been slowly coming to see their potentials as long term survival kit.

However the idea of buying an antique flintlock piece has never occured to me before.

This is an interesting concept and one which I think does have value for Survivalists given the present status of our laws.
Image


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Bug
Posts in topic: 3
Posts: 113
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 5:25 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Bug » Sun Jun 16, 2019 7:34 pm

What are the licensing requirements for a flintlock pistol? I'd love one.



Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
seatard
Posts in topic: 2
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:33 pm
Location: Perth

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by seatard » Sun Jun 16, 2019 9:33 pm

Flintlocks will stand the test of time and I can see why they will be appealing to some but I can see a few downsides to using them.

The first is the time it takes to reload, in a hunting situation 1 shot kills are always preferred but not always the case so quick follow up shots are necessary. Modern firearms are quick to reload and can be fitted with sights.

Second is similar to the first but in a self defence situation. Unless you are up against a single enemy then you could stand a chance and that’s if you can kill or incapacitate them so they can’t attack you back. A modern firearm is quick to reload.

The third is being that you can’t currently use it in NSW you could be inexperienced in the use of the firearm. How do you know how much gunpowder to use? What’s the recoil like? How accurate are you? And are they sighted for point of impact? Could be a very costly and a huge waste of time if your hunting rifle doesn’t hit where you aim.

Just a few reasons why a modern firearm may be better suited to the inexperienced and it’s not all that hard to licence a firearm and follow the rules.



Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
Keith
Posts in topic: 7
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Keith » Mon Jun 17, 2019 11:26 am

Bug wrote:
Sun Jun 16, 2019 7:34 pm
What are the licensing requirements for a flintlock pistol? I'd love one.
If it is an antique like mine Bug, there are no licensing requirements, no registration, no permit to purchase, not in NSW anyway. I think other states are much the same.
Reproduction flintlock pistols however are treated the same as any modern pistol, H class license, the whole works. Ridiculous law.
Keith.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
Keith
Posts in topic: 7
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Keith » Mon Jun 17, 2019 11:54 am

seatard wrote:
Sun Jun 16, 2019 9:33 pm
Flintlocks will stand the test of time and I can see why they will be appealing to some but I can see a few downsides to using them.

The first is the time it takes to reload, in a hunting situation 1 shot kills are always preferred but not always the case so quick follow up shots are necessary. Modern firearms are quick to reload and can be fitted with sights.

Second is similar to the first but in a self defence situation. Unless you are up against a single enemy then you could stand a chance and that’s if you can kill or incapacitate them so they can’t attack you back. A modern firearm is quick to reload.

The third is being that you can’t currently use it in NSW you could be inexperienced in the use of the firearm. How do you know how much gunpowder to use? What’s the recoil like? How accurate are you? And are they sighted for point of impact? Could be a very costly and a huge waste of time if your hunting rifle doesn’t hit where you aim.

Just a few reasons why a modern firearm may be better suited to the inexperienced and it’s not all that hard to licence a firearm and follow the rules.
1) Actually it does not take very long to reload a muzzle-loading gun, rifle or pistol, though smoothbore is faster to reload than rifled. Using a cartridge makes reloading even faster.
2) Shooting at targets you can't see properly is a waste of ammo using any firearm, but if you have a good target then a muzzle-loading gun or rifle will take them out. The pistol is used as a back-up, close range. A smoothbore pistol loaded with buckshot will clear a wide path, & there is no chance of missing!
3) There is no law against using muzzle-loading guns or rifles off range. Pistols can only legally be used on a pistol range. That is the same even for modern guns, rifles & pistols. So if you want to use a flintlock pistol to learn what it feels like, you can join a pistol club. There is plenty of information on loads & loading available, including asking me. Costly & a waste of time? Not quite sure I understand this one seatard. Costly in as a charging boar may get you? Yes possibly, but a smoothbore loaded with buck & ball will stop a freight train, & no chance of missing. If you did miss, then that is when you use the pistol, also loaded with buckshot. Waste of time? Sorry, but I don't understand this one.
If you can use a breach-loader, then you can use a muzzle-loader. Yes a little more knowledge is required to make a flintlock perform at its best, but this is not hard to learn.
Keith.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
Keith
Posts in topic: 7
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Keith » Mon Jun 17, 2019 11:55 am

Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
1) Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent caliber firearm.
2) The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies/conical slugs).
3) The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
4) You can vary the load if needs be.
5) The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
6) Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
7) You can make your own gunpowder.
8) You can use the lock to make fire without using gunpowder.
9) You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
10) IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
11) If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
12) You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
13) Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
14) Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
15) Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of caliber (NSW).
16) A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks. For larger game you can load with conical slugs, which of course you can make yourself in the field.
17) Damage from a .62 caliber or .70 caliber pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
18) By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
19) There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
20) Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.
Keith.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
Image

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
seatard
Posts in topic: 2
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:33 pm
Location: Perth

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by seatard » Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:38 pm

I’m not referring to people who have experience, I’m talking about the inexperienced who will try get one via the antique laws. This thread is commenting on how great they are (and I’m not saying that they aren’t) but a modern firearm is a lot more user friendly to a beginner.

All my points are compared to modern firearms and the inexperienced.

Cycling a bolt or lever is a lot faster then the fastest person reloading a muzzle loading gun

In any scenario, a modern firearm fitted with optics or sight will be a lot more accurate then a flintlock or muzzle loader. While hunting you will very rarely be taking close shots so unless you are a skilled hunter optics will help with the distance.

The comment of it being costly and a waste of time is following your comment about not being able to use it right now. In that case the only time you can shoot it is after the world ends as we know it and it will be costly to practice as you will be going through all your supplies.

In WA there is way of getting one without having a firearms licence



Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Bug
Posts in topic: 3
Posts: 113
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 5:25 pm

Re: The Flintlock Pistol.

Post by Bug » Thu Jun 20, 2019 6:57 pm

What does one of the antique ones cost?



Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post