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firearm for survival

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zane.lorimer
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firearm for survival

Post by zane.lorimer » Sun Jan 07, 2018 1:36 pm

I will try and get this discussion started , in my opinion too many people plan to hunt with cannons all the time.
In my bug out carry gear is a .223 rem and reloads that shoot straight in MY rifle.
In my vehicle i would carry three rifles , .22lr for the rabbits -cheap to run and ammo easy to carry,
.223 rem perfect for small deer sheep goats and ammo reloadable quick and easy -low powder use.
30/06 will kill a samber /red deer and cow easily and very reloadable big projectile and burns three times the powder but great kill and range.
My wirehair pointer dog can find deer and the deer seem too avoid him but not run which gets me closer for the food/kill shot.
Recommend getting hunting dog and not defence ??



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cammo123
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Location: South Australia

Re: firearm for survival

Post by cammo123 » Sun Jan 07, 2018 2:46 pm

My trusty CZ .22 with a Leupold 3-9x40, you can carry hundreds of rounds with relative ease. If your going to be trekking or walking long distances you need something light weight/and easy to use. Zane.lorimer is on the money with the .223 rem or 5.56mm firearm. The ADF uses the same cartridge so ammo should be readily available in a SHTF scenario, the .223 has good hitting power at a reasonable distance. If it were me I would have x3 firearms for when the SHTF...

1.My CZ .22 Leupold 3-9x40
2.My Tikka T3 .223 Leupold 4-12x40
3.My lever Action 12g for self defence and running/flying small game.

Cheers Cammo.



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Australianprepper1
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Australianprepper1 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:49 am

Hey guys,
I've been an avid bow hunter for years and am now looking at applying for my firearms licence and getting a couple of rifles and maybe a shotgun. Just want to know what people recommend in the way of brands and calibers and why?



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Benchwarmer
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Benchwarmer » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:48 pm

Jumping through all the hoops ATM I'm looking at GP100 revolver and a Marlin 1894CST .357( being released this year) also giving me a chance to learn reloading. Handgun casings from the range loaded for use out of the carbine. The Mrs is going for a Beretta 87 target and a little .22 ruger American



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zane.lorimer
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by zane.lorimer » Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:27 pm

The main criteria for calibre selection would have to be what is the easiest to find / buy hence my .22-.223-30/06 all these have the largest /broadest range of all the calibres on the market. Factory ammo is wonderful but for me i prefer the reloading option , my .223 rem shoots well with factory if i buy from the same batch which means i buy 250-300 rounds at a time and waste 10-15 sighting in .
Explanation : when a factory setup and make ammo they will say make 5000 rounds of .223 and then retool and make 5000 rounds of .243 .
During the run of ammo the machines tolerances are set at start and "may" differ by a small acceptable amount which is fine , but the next batch that is made may have a different start set point and won't have the same point of impact .
My .223 and mates 22-250 had issues that proved this point , we reloaded and eliminated variables by tuning rounds to suit each rifle - varied grains of powder , seating depths of projectiles , projectile weights ,crimping , case lengths.
Reloading also gives the advantage of reusing cases in field , simple .
I shot pistols {ipsc /action match} for 4 years and target pistol for 8 years but handed all my handguns in when the bastards took my 45 colt .
357mag is great for pigs in Bourke out the ute over stubble , i use my marlin 357mag rifle every time i go up there - hang rifle out driver side door and swing rifle by lever , useing pistol red dot on the top makes quick work of shooting pigs whilst driving {i'm not a cowboy shooter} .



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Paul
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Paul » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:49 am

For me guns are a bit like generators ,good while you have access to fuel or in this case bullets. Personally try not to rely on normal day commodities which is why I choose a bow . Much more easier to supply amunition should society shut down.



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zane.lorimer
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by zane.lorimer » Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:42 pm

Personnal preference : .223 rifle , i can carry reoading gear for 200 rounds that packs to size of coke can including press and drop deer at 100m .
Rifle has 15 rounds on the stock in stock wrap and belt pouch carries 20.
How accurate are the arrows made in the bush , not being smart how do you get the shaft straight and stiff.
As a child i had a recurve bow and bought shafts as i couldn't get the tee tree sticks straight nor feathers straight.
Note to benchwarmer - .357mag is the best round to start reloading as it has straight walls and forgiving in carbine - copper jacket projectiles in hollow point for tube mag .



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Paul
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Paul » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:08 pm

zane.lorimer wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:42 pm
Personnal preference : .223 rifle , i can carry reoading gear for 200 rounds that packs to size of coke can including press and drop deer at 100m .
Rifle has 15 rounds on the stock in stock wrap and belt pouch carries 20.
How accurate are the arrows made in the bush , not being smart how do you get the shaft straight and stiff.
As a child i had a recurve bow and bought shafts as i couldn't get the tee tree sticks straight nor feathers straight.
Note to benchwarmer - .357mag is the best round to start reloading as it has straight walls and forgiving in carbine - copper jacket projectiles in hollow point for tube mag .
Heat for straightening and strengthen of shaft and feathers by eye which isn't that hard .At the end of the day you are truly hunting which means distance should be close down wind and silent .Patience and understanding is the key.You are not shooting at a target 50 metres away aiming to get the highest on a score board at a club.If unfortunate enough not to be a one shot drop a little tracking is well worth it for hunter and hunted so no one suffers.



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StealthHunter
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by StealthHunter » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:13 pm

sorry I don't know how to quote people but in the comment above me how would you use heat to straighten shafts I am aware of 'fire hardening ' techniques but I don't know what you mean by using heat to straighten them, could you explain a method


- Stealthhunter



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Paul
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Paul » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:52 pm

StealthHunter wrote:
Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:13 pm
sorry I don't know how to quote people but in the comment above me how would you use heat to straighten shafts I am aware of 'fire hardening ' techniques but I don't know what you mean by using heat to straighten them, could you explain a method


- Stealthhunter
Select cut to length and from end to other where there is a bend ,bend in opposite directions continue to straighten looking down shaft opposite ends until satisfied .Unlike hardening the end directly in coals you cover the shaft with hot sand.This helps by slowly removing some moisture and tightening fibres gently adding a little strength. Can get a little warm on the hands first time and not completely necessary considering my bush arrows really are one use one shot only.



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