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firearm for survival

'Nuff said. Lets talk.
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MasterChief
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by MasterChief » Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:23 am

Its tricky with kids, we see every opportunity as a teaching example, they see it as work.

Im not guru and suffer with the best of dads out there but going to swimming holes with friends as a group/family has worked well for us.

They see it as a fun day, but you get an opportuntiy do and talk about other stuff, without being too preachy too - and make the offer - if you want to do more let me know"

Really depends on the age and temperament I guess.


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Vessels&Valves
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Vessels&Valves » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:06 pm

zane.lorimer wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:27 pm
The main criteria for calibre selection would have to be what is the easiest to find / buy hence my .22-.223-30/06 all these have the largest /broadest range of all the calibres on the market. Factory ammo is wonderful but for me i prefer the reloading option , my .223 rem shoots well with factory if i buy from the same batch which means i buy 250-300 rounds at a time and waste 10-15 sighting in .
Explanation : when a factory setup and make ammo they will say make 5000 rounds of .223 and then retool and make 5000 rounds of .243 .
During the run of ammo the machines tolerances are set at start and "may" differ by a small acceptable amount which is fine , but the next batch that is made may have a different start set point and won't have the same point of impact .
My .223 and mates 22-250 had issues that proved this point , we reloaded and eliminated variables by tuning rounds to suit each rifle - varied grains of powder , seating depths of projectiles , projectile weights ,crimping , case lengths.
Reloading also gives the advantage of reusing cases in field , simple .
I shot pistols {ipsc /action match} for 4 years and target pistol for 8 years but handed all my handguns in when the bastards took my 45 colt .
357mag is great for pigs in Bourke out the ute over stubble , i use my marlin 357mag rifle every time i go up there - hang rifle out driver side door and swing rifle by lever , useing pistol red dot on the top makes quick work of shooting pigs whilst driving {i'm not a cowboy shooter} .
I thought it was illegal in Australia to shoot from inside a vehicle ?

fortunately you did it overseas where the laws are not the same so nobody can knock on your door and prosecute you.

i have heard of a guy in regional NSW who had everything confiscated for just sitting on his drivers seat and using the open door for a rifle rest...



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Keith
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Keith » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:08 pm

I own modern firearms, & I believe that guns are important for survival. Traditional bows are good for hunting & I am in the process of making a self bow for myself. But bows lack one thing when it comes to defence, the shock value. You can't beat a bang & flying lead to drive people off or make them keep their heads down. However, my modern guns would be kept in reserve for defence, & not used for hunting.
Now I know a lot of modern gun users will disagree with my choice of guns, but I have been using muzzle-loading guns for over 40 years for hunting, & if I had to leave home & travel alone, & I could only carry one long gun with me, then I would choose to carry my .62 caliber flintlock fusil. As it happens, I live off grid & don't plan on leaving my forest so long as we can defend what we have, & if we did have to leave, then other family members would be carrying my modern firearms.

This is why I choose the muzzle-loader over a modern firearms for long term wilderness living.
Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
1) Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent calibre firearm.
2) The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies/conical slugs).
3) The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
4) You can vary the load if needs be.
5) The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
6) Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
7) You can make your own gunpowder.
8) You can use the lock to make fire without using gunpowder.
9) You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
10) IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
11) If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
12) You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
13) Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
14) Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
15) Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of calibre (NSW).
16) A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks. For larger game you can load with conical slugs, which of course you can make yourself in the field.
17) Damage from a .62 calibre or .70 calibre pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
18) By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
19) There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
20) Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.
Image
.62 caliber flintlock fusil with a 42 inch barrel.
Image
.32 caliber flintlock rifle with double set triggers.
Image
.70 caliber flintlock pistol with a brass cannon barrel & a left hand lock.

The antique hand gun is available to anyone who can afford it, no licence, no permit to purchase & no registration. I prefer a flintlock in close quarters to using a knife for defence!
Keith.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
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Keith
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Keith » Tue Mar 27, 2018 7:03 pm

MasterChief wrote:
Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:23 am
Its tricky with kids, we see every opportunity as a teaching example, they see it as work.

Im not guru and suffer with the best of dads out there but going to swimming holes with friends as a group/family has worked well for us.

They see it as a fun day, but you get an opportuntiy do and talk about other stuff, without being too preachy too - and make the offer - if you want to do more let me know"

Really depends on the age and temperament I guess.
Never had a problem teaching my boys to shoot with a flintlock rifle. I made a forked stick to take the weight of the rifle & it worked fine.
Keith.
Image
.32 caliber flintlock rifle with double set triggers. Boys rifle.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
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zpoc
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by zpoc » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:47 am

what is the process for attaining a firearm in aus someone plz respond



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Keith
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Keith » Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:01 pm

zpoc wrote:
Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:47 am
what is the process for attaining a firearm in aus someone plz respond
When you apply for a firearms licence you have to have passed an exam first. Then you have to fill out a standard form. This form will ask you for what purpose do you intend to use the gun for. You have several choices, the main ones for the average person are: Hunting & target shooting. If you are hunting then you need to be a land owner, or you have to have written permission from a land owner to shoot on their land.
If you are target shooting, then you have to be a member of a recognised registered shooting club. You are only allowed to use your gun for the purpose you have stated, E.G. you can't use your gun for hunting if you only chose target shooting.
Once you have the licence you have to apply to purchase a gun, & the police dept will issue you with a permit to purchase. The only gun,rifle/pistol you can purchase without a licence or permit to purchase in an antique.
Once you have your firearm, you have to have it registered. Again, an antique is the only firearm that does not have to be registered. The catch is, that legally you are not allowed to fire an antique firearm. However, in a shtf situation in a lawless society this won't be the case.
Keith.


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by,
and that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
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Oz judge
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Re: firearm for survival

Post by Oz judge » Mon Jul 02, 2018 4:01 pm

22 magnum for me. Can easily carry 50 rounds in a pocket. Shoots straight to 120-130 meters & has enough power to kill most things. Have plenty of others to choose from if there's a special job at hand.



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